IN MALAYSIA, THE ‘AFTERLIFE’ MORE IMPORTANT THAN SCHOOLING? IMAGINE IF ALL MALAY PARENTS STOPPED THEIR KIDS FROM GOING TO SCHOOL SO AS TO PREPARE THEM FOR THE ‘AFTERLIFE’ – WHAT WOULD HAPPEN TO THE COUNTRY & THEIR RACE! CONGRATS ANWAR, PAS, MAHATHIR, UMNO & NOW PN FOR SPAWNING & CONTINUING AN EDUCATION POLICY THAT FROM DAY ONE WAS DOOMED

It’s short-sighted to put the afterlife ahead of schooling

The actor Zul Yahya, of the Pepaya television drama, has stopped his children from going to school, saying his priority is to prepare them for the afterlife. He is very short-sighted and is starting a dangerous precedent.

More importantly, he is denying his children the right to an education, and the means to fulfil their hopes and aspirations.

If all Malay parents were like Zul, Malaysia would have to rely on the ‘pendatang’ to provide professionals such as chemists, architects, engineers, scientists, epidemiologists, virologists, IT experts, economists, lawyers and doctors.

In his postings on Instagram and Facebook on Feb 22, Zul told his fans that his action was the most appropriate at this time.

The actor and his wife have been married for 14 years and have six children, three girls and three boys, whose ages range from one to nine years.

He claimed that his top priority for his children was to prepare them for the afterlife. This is in direct opposition to all Islamic teachings, which promotes the acquisition of knowledge and is obligatory for every Muslim.

Dismissing criticism by his fans that he was not concerned about the future of his six children, Zul said he was more concerned about their success in the afterlife. The 48-year-old said: “God willing, the knowledge of the afterlife is more important than all knowledge.”

Will he be fined, because all children are supposed to be given an education until they are 16 years old?

How many parents are like Zul?

One parent told me that many parents at her children’s primary school in Butterworth had stopped their children’s schooling because they saw little point in education. The children would be put to better use working in the parent’s nasi kandar stalls, preparing the client’s drinks and helping to wash the dishes.

How widespread is this belief, that schooling is not of any use? Has a survey been conducted by the education ministry to find the veracity of this allegation?

Zul cannot have studied history at school, or if he did, can’t have been concentrating. Our forefathers fought hard to demand that the British provide an education for their children. They battled prejudice, a lack of qualified teachers and the social and cultural norms of the time.

When Islam was brought to the Malay peninsula by traders from India and the Gulf, education among the Malays was equated with religious learning. Imams conducted lessons in attap schools or madrasahs, and in the 1870s, the British established free Malay-medium primary schools.

Although the education was limited – with only four years of tuition, the pupils learnt little more than basic literacy and numeracy skills – an important trend was established.

These schools were a catalyst for social and political change. Malay girls were given access to formal education in 1885 and in 1922, British historian Richard O Winstedt helped to establish the Sultan Idris Training College, to produce Malay teachers. The college became a centre of Malay intellectual life.

Education for the Chinese was not provided by the British and so the community was forced to start and manage their own schools. As the population grew, these schools mushroomed.

The Indian community, especially those living on the estates, had no access to education until the 1923 Labour Code compelled estate owners to provide educational facilities.

Without assistance from the British, both these communities based their curriculum on China or India.

Urban children were more fortunate as mission schools were established, and the westernised elite also started many English schools.

Many Malay fathers and grandfathers were aware that an education was crucial to lift their children, especially their daughters, out of the poverty trap.

That is why Zul’s actions are wrong. Our forefathers have always maintained that status, social class or money, should not prevent a child from gaining an education and a brighter future.

School is where our children receive the necessary foundations to either continue their studies or acquire skills to become part of the country’s workforce. School is where we learn about social skills, and interaction with other people, especially those from other cultures and faiths.

School is where we discover our potential and how to deal with our shortcomings. It is the discipline that school provides, the importance of working hard, of teamwork, and adhering to deadlines that helps build character.

An interest in certain subjects and after-school activities will motivate a child to become a scientist, an artist or a teacher.

By all means, provide religious education after school, but formal schooling is where our children can start to build their hopes and dreams. More importantly, schools help to safeguard the long-term future of Malaysia and its economy.

Zul is very short-sighted and is condemning his children to a life of poverty and ignorance.

WRITER: MARIAM MOKHTAR

FREE MALAYSIA TODAY

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