PROTECTED BY THE GREAT MAHATHIR, ZAKIR NAIK THUMBS NOSE AT ‘ANTI-ISLAM’ INDIA: I’LL GO BACK ONLY IF INDIA COURT ASSURES I WON’T BE JAILED UNTIL CONVICTION – ‘ANYONE WITH RATIONAL MIND CAN SEE INDIAN AGENCIES DRIVEN BY POLITICAL BOSSES’

ZAKIR Naik is confident Putrajaya will stand by him and oppose any move by the Indian government to extradite him, reports theSundaily.

“I am positive that the Malaysian government will not be misled by the politically motivated allegations made by the anti-Islamic Indian government,” he was quoted as saying by the paper.

He pointed out that Malaysia awarded him the International Tokoh Maal Hijrah award, one of the country’s highest accolades, in November 2013.

“I was the fourth foreigner to ever receive it. You don’t expect the Malaysian government to award (it to) me without verifying my credentials,” he told the paper.

“I don’t see the stance changing,” he told the paper.

Yesterday, Prime Minister Dr Mahathir Mohamad said India must first assure Malaysia that Zakir will receive just treatment before Putrajaya decides whether to send him back.

“Before we accept an extradition request, we need to know what will happen to the person who is to be extradited,” he said, adding that the government is entitled to determine if the person sent back will be accorded justice.

Last month, Zakir told Indian magazine The Week that he would return on the condition that he would not be arrested until his conviction.

He had said India’s National Investigation Agency, which is investigating him for terrorism and money-laundering, could question him in Malaysia.

Zakir said India failed to produce any evidence to back up the charges against him, thus compelling Interpol to withhold the issuing of a red notice. THE MALAYSIAN INSIGHT

Zakir wants India court’s assurance he won’t be jailed until conviction

PREACHER Zakir Naik said he wants the Indian Supreme Court’s assurance that he will not be jailed until his conviction, reports theSun.

The controversial figure said he will return to his home country should the top court give him the said assurance in writing.

Zakir said he trusts India’s judiciary, but not so much its prosecution system.

“Any rational mind would see that Indian agencies are not driven by their duty to solve crime, but by their political bosses,” he was quoted as saying.

India media reported that the country’s Enforcement Directorate (ED) is set to secure arrest warrants for Zakir and others in an ongoing trial being heard by a special court in Mumbai under the Prevention of Money-Laundering Act 2002.

The Mumbai court will decide whether a non-bailable warrant should be issued against Zakir at the next hearing on June 19.

ED will then request an Interpol red notice against the preacher, as well as his extradition from Malaysia, after obtaining a non-bailable warrant.

Zakir, who has permanent resident status in Malaysia, has consistently rejected all allegations against him, including of inciting Muslims to commit terrorism.

Yesterday, Prime Minister Dr Mahathir Mohamad said India must first assure Malaysia that Zakir will receive just treatment before Putrajaya decides whether to send him back.

“Before we accept an extradition request, we need to know what will happen to the person who is to be extradited,” he said, adding that the government is entitled to determine if the person sent back will be accorded justice.

Last month, Zakir told Indian magazine The Week that he would return on the condition that he would not be arrested until his conviction.

He had said India’s National Investigation Agency, which is investigating him for terrorism and money-laundering, could question him in Malaysia. THE MALAYSIAN INSIGHT

THE MALAYSIAN INSIGHT

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