IN STUNNING SLAP TO NAJIB, 84% OF JOHOR MALAYS WANT SULTAN IBRAHIM TO INTERVENE IN POLITICS, WHILE 9 OUT OF 10 JOHOREANS OF ALL RACES IDENTIFY WITH ‘BANGSA JOHOR’

JOHOR BAHARU, 8 April -- Sultan Johor Sultan Ibrahim Sultan Iskandar diiringi Tunku Mahkota Johor Tunku Ismail Sultan Ibrahim (kiri) berkenan menandatangani plak perasmian Kem Baharu Askar Timbalan Setia Negeri Johor hari ini. --fotoBERNAMA (2016) HAK CIPTA TERPELIHARA

KUALA LUMPUR — Three-quarters of Johor folks polled by Singapore-based research centre ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute revealed they agree with the Johor royal house intervening in politics should the need arise.

In the survey results released this week, the highest support for this notion came from the Malays in the southern state, at 84.9 per cent, followed by the ethnic Chinese at 65.1 per cent, and Indians (53.2 per cent).

“The strong Malay support for the Johor Sultan intervention in politics when necessary is consistent with the community’s acceptance of the Sultan’s traditional role as their ‘protector’,” the report said.

Furthermore, those responded also had no problems with the royalty involving itself in business ventures.

Over half, at 51.8 per cent, disagreed that the royal house should refrain from business ventures.

Broken by ethnicities, close to 59 per cent of Malays supported such business ventures, compared to the Indians (52 per cent), and the Chinese (40.5 per cent).

“Finally, 18.8 per cent of Chinese respondents, 19.5 per cent Indian respondents, and only 6.2 Malay respondents are unsure whether or not the Johor royalty should refrain from business ventures,” it said.

In addition, those polled also viewed the monarchy positively, agreeing that the Johor royal family is a good steward of the state’s resources, the Sultan looks after the personal interests of the citizens, and is a good guardian of Islam.

The survey polled 2,011 respondents from Johor by phone between May and June this year.

Malays made up 55 per cent of the respondents, Chinese at 38 per cent, and Indian at 7 per cent.

ONE IN 10 JOHOREANS IDENTIFY AS ‘BANGSA JOHOR’ FIRST, MALAYSIANS SECOND

KUALA LUMPUR – A recent survey by Singapore-based ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute found that Johor citizens across all races identify strongly with the “Bangsa Johor” identity.

Nearly nine out of 10 of Johor folks polled identified with the label, with over one in 10 even saying that they identify with the state identity more than their national identity.

“However, although 88 per cent of all respondents identify with ‘Bangsa Johor’, nevertheless only 14 per cent see themselves as ‘Bangsa Johor’ first; compared to 39 per cent identifying themselves firstly as Malaysian citizen and 33 per cent on the basis of religious affiliation,” said its report titled “Views on Identity, Education and the Johor Royal Family”.

“Only respondents who identify themselves with their ethnicity first, at 10 per cent, are less than those who identify themselves as ‘Bangsa Johor’ first. In other words, respondents in Johor do not display a strong regional identity, unlike in the states of Sabah and Sarawak.”

In comparison, most Malays identify as Muslims first and foremost, at 56.5 per cent, followed by citizen first (25.5 per cent), “Bangsa Johor” first (14.3 per cent), and Malay first (only 3.3 per cent).

“In contrast, only 2.2 per cent of Chinese and 19.5 per cent of Indian respondents identify themselves based on religious affiliation first.

“The majority of Chinese and Indian respondents identify themselves as Malaysian first, at 60.4 per cent and 34.1 per cent respectively,” the report said.

The survey polled 2,011 respondents from Johor by phone between May and June this year.

Malays made up 55 per cent of the respondents, Chinese at 38 per cent, and Indian at 7 per cent.

Johor crown prince Tunku Ismail Ibrahim has on several occasions suggested that his state was entitled to leave Malaysia if it was unhappy with the federal government, most recently in June last year.

He had then challenged detractors to seek his state’s expulsion from the country if they were unhappy with how it was being governed.

The Johor royal also espoused the notion of “Bangsa Johor”, saying the concept united the state’s residents without regard to race.

In response, former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said in August last year that promoting affinity to individual states over the country will divide Malaysians, and such notions could encourage “unhealthy” feelings of superiority by the residents of one state over another.

Johor’s Sultan Ibrahim Iskandar later chided Dr Mahathir over his remarks, and promoted the “Bangsa Johor” concept of unity as something which other states can learn from.

– Malay Mail

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